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D2: Revitalize Stream, Upland and Wetland Habitat*

About This Project

This project allows Valley Water to remove non-native, invasive plants and revegetate habitat with native species when needed. Funding also restores degraded habitat between revegetated sites to create a more contiguous habitat corridor for wildlife. This project includes targeted control of especially damaging non-native, invasive plant species such as Arundo donax, and education for nearby landowners and other stakeholder groups on the control of harmful species. This project also helps implement the Stream Corridor Priority Plans developed in Project D3.

 

*This project was voter approved as part of the Safe, Clean Water and Natural Flood Protection Program.

LGRP RchC
Datapoints
Status
On Target
Location
Countywide
Schedule
Start FY 2014 / Finish FY 2028
Funding
Safe, Clean Water Fund ($18.2 million); Watershed and Stream Stewardship Fund
News and UpdatesNews and Updates
Reports and DocumentsReports and Documents
Environmental and Community BenefitsEnvironmental and Community Benefits
History and BackgroundHistory and Background
News & Updates

Key Performance Indicators for the Safe, Clean Water Program 

Removed approximately 63 acres of invasive exotic plants above Lexington Reservoir, lower Guadalupe River, Stevens Creek, Saratoga Creek, and South San Francisco Bay (about 10 acres under KPI #1 and 53 acres under KPI #2 partnerships).

KPI #1: Revitalize at least 21 acres, guided by the 5 Stream Corridor Priority Plans, through native plant revegetation and removal of invasive exotic species. 

KPI #2: Provide funding for revitalization of  at least 7 of 21 acres through community partnerships.

  • Established partnerships with the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District (Midpen) in July 2017, California State Coastal Conservancy in January 2018, and the City of San José in March 2018.
  • Controlled nearly 5 acres of smooth cordgrass (Spartina alternflora), some originally under a Clean, Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection grant, in partnership with the Coastal Conservancy and Invasive Spartina Project.
  • Working cooperatively with the City of San José on Coyote Creek in response to the 2017 flood. Valley Water's SMP began removing giant reed (Arundo donax) for the City on the south side of Coyote Creek at Oakland Road. The City is currently contracting to continue eradicating the giant reed.
  • Formed the Santa Clara County Wildlife Corridors Working Group with US Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), CalTrans, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Santa Clara County Parks, Santa Clara Valley Habitat Agency, Peninsula Open Space Trust (POST), Open Space Authority (OSA), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), De Anza College, and others.

KPI #3: Develop at least 2 plant palettes for use on revegetation projects to support birds and other wildlife.

Completed 5 plant palettes for revegetation projects, landscaping and native gardens with links to use by birds, bees, butterflies, and wildlife. 

See the Reports & Documents tab for more on native gardens.

Updated August 2019

For more information:

Reports & Documents

Related information

Methods to control invasive plants 

Water mold alerts

Phytophthora species are pathogenic water molds affecting our native plants. For more information, go to Why the concern (2015), CNPS and below. 

Record, Track and Monitor Weeds

  • Calflora’s Weed Manager (WM) is a system which enables organizations engaged in land management to track weed infestations and treatments over time. 

Native Plant Gardens

Updated August 2019

Environmental & Community Benefits

Key Performance Indicators for the Safe, Clean Water Program

  1. Revitalize at least 21 acres, guided by the 5 Stream Corridor Priority Plans, through native plant revegetation and removal of invasive exotic species. 

  2. Provide funding for revitalization of at least 7 of 21 acres through community partnerships.

  3. Develop at least 2 plant palettes for use on revegetation projects to support birds and other wildlife.

Benefits

  • Increases viability of native riparian species by reducing competition from non-native, invasive species

  • Improves habitat by installing tidal and riparian plant species

  • Improves ecological function of existing riparian and wetland habitats to support more diverse wildlife species

  • Improves patchy wildlife corridors by increasing connectivity of habitat

  • Increases community awareness about the damaging impact that non-native, invasive plants have on local ecosystems

Geographic Area of Benefit

Countywide

History & Background

About the Safe, Clean Water and Natural Flood Protection Program

In November 2012 the voters of Santa Clara County overwhelmingly approved Measure B, the Safe, Clean Water and Natural Flood Protection Program, as a countywide special parcel tax for 15 years with a sunset date of June 30, 2028. This Program replaced the Clean, Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection Plan, which voters approved in November 2000.

The Safe, Clean Water Program was developed with input from more than 16,000 residents and stakeholders and was created to match the community’s needs and values. The voters of Santa Clara County identified five priorities:

Priority A: Ensure a Safe, Reliable Water Supply

Priority B: Reduce Toxins, Hazards and Contaminants in our Waterways

Priority C: Protect our Water Supply from Earthquakes and Natural Disasters

Priority D: Restore Wildlife Habitat and Provide Open Space

Priority E: Provide Flood Protection to Homes, Businesses, Schools and Highways

Other: Six projects from the Clean, Safe, Creeks Plan have been carried forward into the Safe, Clean Water Program.  

Each year, Valley Water prepares a report providing a progress update for each of these Program priorities, along with fiscal year accomplishments.

To ensure transparency and accountability to the voters, the ballot measure also created an Independent Monitoring Committee, appointed by the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors. The Independent Monitoring Committee annually reviews the Program’s progress to ensure the outcomes are achieved in a cost-efficient manner and reports its findings to the Board.

In addition, the Program requires three independent audits, the first of which was conducted in FY 2017.

View the Safe, Clean Water Program’s annual reports, annual IMC audit reports, and independent audits, including a staff response, on the Valley Water website.