Alert 11/16/21 | 5:01 PM: Santa Clara County remains in a drought emergency, despite the rain. Learn more
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Nov. 16, 2021 

Santa Clara County used 7% less water in Sept. 2021 compared to Sept. 2019. While this is progress, more water conservation is needed to meet the Valley Water Board of Director’s call for a 15% reduction in water use.

One of the easiest ways to save water is by turning off all outdoor irrigation when it rains. Valley Water also offers tips, tools and rebates to help you make small and big changes that can make a difference and help protect our water supply. Find out more at watersavings.org.

Oct. 21, 2021

Valley Water Board Chair Tony Estremera statement on upcoming weekend storms and continued drought

As this weekend’s storms approach, my fellow Board Members and I would like to remind Santa Clara County that we will continue to be in a drought emergency once the storm passes. While some parts of Santa Clara County may see significant rainfall totals, it is not nearly enough to end the drought.

We must continue to conserve water whenever possible.

We’re all looking forward to receiving the much-needed rain. However, for the drought to end, our region would need several more storms to fill our local reservoirs and produce enough snowpack in the Sierra Nevada to fill state and federal reservoirs. These reservoirs, along with ongoing snowmelt and runoff through the summer, provide Santa Clara County with about half of our yearly water supply.

With this early-season rain, we’d like to remind residents to turn off their sprinklers for the rest of the week. And as we approach the winter months, please dial-back your watering schedule as plants don’t need as much water in cooler weather.

We’d like to thank the Santa Clara community for continuing to reduce their water use over the course of the last several months. While we’ve made great progress in this effort, we still have work to do.

Conservation is just one tool we are using to contend with drought. Valley Water is leading the way out of drought through technology. One solution we must take advantage of is expanding our use of purified water, a drought-resilient and locally controlled source.

Although we are experiencing a drought emergency, we must be prepared for the potential of flooding this winter. As we continue into the wet season, please be aware if your home or business is in a Special Flood Hazard Area. We advise you to take the proper precautions for future storms.

For conservation tips, tools, and rebates visit watersavings.org.

To find out if your home or business is in a Special Flood Hazard Area visit valleywater.org/floodready.

 

 

Sept. 29, 2021

Santa Clara County is in an extreme and exceptional drought and Valley Water can help you save water. Please check out our BeHeard Drought and Water Conservation | Be Heard Valley Water page to get updated information on water conservation tips, Valley Water’s rebate programs, information about your drought retailer and frequently asked questions.

 

July 8, 2021

Valley Water Board Chair Tony Estremera statement on Gov. Newsom's drought declaration for Santa Clara County

Today’s action by Gov. Gavin Newsom to include Santa Clara County in the state’s drought emergency proclamation underscores the serious threats facing our region’s water supply.

I would like to thank Gov. Newsom for his leadership in making this declaration as our county contends with a water shortage emergency condition. The declaration by Gov. Newsom ensures that state agencies are empowered to facilitate critical water transfers and exchanges necessary to continue a reliable water supply for the 2 million people and thousands of Silicon Valley businesses in Santa Clara County.

On June 9, our Board declared a water shortage emergency condition, one of the strongest actions we can take. While we celebrated the groundbreaking of the Anderson Dam project this week, we know our largest drinking water reservoir will be out of service for 10 years. If the drought continues into next year, we could face the possibility there will not be enough water to meet basic demands without serious risk of subsidence in 2022.

Valley Water is doing everything we can to ensure we can provide safe, clean water to Santa Clara County. In addition to engaging with federal and state agencies, Valley Water is working with the County of Santa Clara, cities and water retailers to take additional measures to protect our water supplies and conserve this precious resource.

The proclamation by Gov. Newsom amplifies how important it is for all our communities to reduce their water use during this extreme drought. Many people reduced their water use significantly during the last drought. Valley Water thanks them for their conservation efforts and encourages everyone to keep up the good work. Valley Water offers robust conservation programs that can help our communities save water and money, including our Landscape Rebate Program. Community members who want to replace high-water using landscapes with drought-resilient ones can now receive an increased rebate. Learn about all our rebate programs, conservation tips and how to get free water-saving tools at watersavings.org.

We can’t predict how long this drought will last. But Valley Water is taking every step possible now to protect our water supplies and groundwater basins for all our communities.

 

June 22, 2021

Valley Water Board Chair Tony Estremera statement on County of Santa Clara's proclamation of a local drought emergency 

Today’s decision by the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to ratify the Proclamation of a Local Emergency issued by the County Director of Emergency Services underscores the seriousness of the threats posed by the extreme drought.

I would like to thank Board President Mike Wasserman for his leadership and extend my gratitude to his colleagues on the Board of Supervisors for taking immediate action as we face this water shortage emergency. I would also like to thank the Office of the County Executive and the Director of Emergency Management Services for taking decisive action following the Valley Water Board's declaration of a Water Shortage Emergency Condition.

Our water supplies are in jeopardy. Together, the actions taken by Valley Water and Santa Clara County acknowledge the water emergency facing our county and position us well to take additional measures to protect our water supplies and work with retailers and our community to conserve this precious resource.

Valley Water is doing everything we can to ensure we can provide safe, clean water to Santa Clara County. 

The resolution by the County Board of Supervisors echoes the call by Valley Water for all our communities to reduce their water use during this extreme drought. Valley Water offers robust conservation programs that can help our communities save water and money, including our Landscape Rebate Program. And beginning July 1, community members who want to replace high-water using landscapes with drought-resilient ones can receive an increased rebate. Learn about all our rebate programs, conservation tips and how to get free water-saving tools at watersavings.org.

To help us achieve our mission of providing safe, clean water to all or communities, we urge Gov. Gavin Newsom to declare a drought emergency in Santa Clara County. This action is needed to help Valley Water be better positioned to receive an emergency supply of imported water to address our county’s public health and safety needs. These emergency water supplies are critical in helping us prevent overdraft of our groundwater basins, dry domestic wells, and subsidence.

Will we see another dry winter? We don’t know. But Valley Water and the County of Santa Clara are taking decisive actions now to protect our water supplies and groundwater basins.

 

June 16, 2021

As of 5 p.m. today, Valley Water activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the extreme drought and water shortage emergency condition in Santa Clara County. Today’s EOC Level 2 activation kicks off the first Operational Period for Drought Response, which will run through Monday, June 21, 2021.

 

June 9, 2021

Valley Water Board Chair Tony Estremera statement on declaration of water shortage emergency condition

Santa Clara County is in extreme drought. We can’t afford to wait to act as our water supplies are being threatened locally and across California. We are in an emergency and Valley Water must do everything we can to protect our groundwater resources and ensure we can provide safe, clean water to Santa Clara County residents and businesses.

To better deal with these threats and the emergency they are causing, today my fellow Board Members and I unanimously declared a water shortage emergency condition in Santa Clara County. This declaration, which is among the strongest actions we can take under law, allows Valley Water to work with our retailers, cities and the county to implement regulations and restrictions on the delivery and consumption of water. We also are urging the County of Santa Clara to proclaim a local emergency and join us in underscoring the seriousness of the threats posed by the extreme drought.

Increased conservation is also necessary to protect local water supplies and guard against groundwater overdraft, subsidence, and dry domestic wells, especially if the drought extends into next year.  That’s why my fellow Board Members and I also are calling for a mandatory 15% reduction in water use compared to 2019.

These actions are necessary as we face further challenges to our local water supply. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ordered Anderson Reservoir to be drained for public safety as we strengthen the dam. This means the largest surface reservoir in Santa Clara County is out of service while performing this critical work.

Our imported water supplies are decreasing because of the historic dry season. About 50% of our water supply comes from outside our county, and the depleted Sierra Nevada snowpack caused a significant reduction in the amount of imported water we will receive this year.

Valley Water is addressing this by working to withdraw previously banked supplies and purchasing emergency water from our partners.

We thank the many people who acted during the last drought and beyond to reduce their water use significantly. Water saved through the years is water we can use now. We urge the community to keep up that great work.

I ask our residents, businesses, and farmers to do your part to help us weather this extreme drought by taking part in our many rebate and conservation programs. Valley Water offers robust conservation programs that can help you save water and money, including an increase in our Landscape Rebate Program beginning July 1. Learn about all our rebate programs, conservation tips and how to get free water-saving tools at watersavings.org.

A reliable supply of safe, clean water is crucial for public health and the economy. We can’t predict how long this drought will last. But we know now is the time for action to protect our groundwater basins and make sure there is enough water for all our communities. Thank you for doing your part.

Learn How to Save 15%